Insulin is NOT a cure

diabetes, insulin

everyday life and adventures with type 1 diabetes

INSULIN. IS. NOT. A. CURE!

Insulin is NOT a cure for diabetes. It is a treatment. A treatment that keeps me alive until we find a cure. I am very, very happy about insulin because without it, I would probably be dead right now but people need to stop thinking that we already found a cure for diabetes.

Insulin is not a cure

I sometimes hear or read, that diabetes can be cured by taking insulin – that is simply a myth. I sometimes also hear people say, that insulin pumps are a cure for diabetes – which is a myth as well. Yes, insulin pumps help managing diabetes, but sadly they “don’t do everything itself” as a lot of people apparently believe. Type 1 diabetes might be manageable, but that doesn’t mean that there’s no need for a cure. Apart from that, insulin prices are increasing and a lot of people don’t even have…

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New story in Politics from Time: Postcard From Germany: Moved For School, Stayed For Insulin

politics , time

The Richardsonian

Every now and then, Katie West considers returning to the U.S. She moved to Germany for graduate school three years ago and now works as a health systems researcher in Hamburg. Her family is an ocean away. Then she remembers why she stays.

West, 30, has had type 1 diabetes since she was three years old. Back in Seattle, where she used to live, she typically paid $70 per month for insulin and another $130 for pump supplies. That was a relative steal in the U.S., made possible by her excellent health insurance, which she got through her employer. But still, it was a financial strain.

In Germany, she pays about ?10, roughly $11. Every three months.

?I don?t ever have to worry,? she says. ?There is not a day I ever have to worry about if I can pay for something, or manage something.?

The price of insulin has…

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I tried closing the loop for 90 days, and this is what happened

Glimmerglykose

First of all, an introduction might be in
order. Hi there! My name is Helene, and I’m a 24-year-old diabetic living in
Aalborg, Denmark. I’m running on a system using an array of diabetes-related
gear, to make a so-called DIY closed-circuit insulin-delivering system. My
collection of gear consists of an Abbott Freestyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitor
(Libre, for short), a MiaoMiao-transmitter (MM, for short), an Insulet OmniPod
insulin-pump (OmniPod, for short), a RileyLink, my smartphone and a smartwatch.
It might seem like a lot of equipment, but what I’m about to show you is a
testimony to the fact that it indeed is worth it!

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes back in the summer of 2008. Last year, in May, I had my first rounddiaversary (to those of you not familiar with that word, it’s like a birthday for your diagnosis). Ten years I had lived with…

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How Taking a Mental Break from Diabetes Changed My Perspective

blood sugar , cgm , diabetes , mental break , mental health , t1d , type 1 diabetes

Cup of Oj

Last weekend I took a ‘mental break’ from my type 1 diabetes.

This didn’t mean that I stopped taking insulin or testing my sugars. (i can’t really do that or i’ll die) I still took care of myself during my ‘break’, but made an effort to take some time off from overthinking it.

My last Dexcom sensor ripped out unexpectedly last week, and I didn’t have a new shipment of sensors coming in for another week or so. I honestly freaked out when this originally happened. I haven’t been without a CGM in about a year! How was I going to feel my lows? What if I trend high for the next week? How will I workout or sleep or know that I am taking the right amount of insulin…

And then I remembered that I had managed my diabetes for 14 years without a CGM. I can always feel…

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Why Stress is Making You Sick

NTP, cortisol, stress, hypothyroid, blood sugar, adrenal

Functional Dysfunction

Today I want to talk to you about stress. We all deal with it, and
our lifestyles today are a breeding ground for chronic stress. With stressful
jobs, busy families, too many commitments, underlying health problem, and poor
food choices, we rarely give our bodies the rest it needs.

Chronic elevated cortisol can wreak major havoc on the endocrine
system. Cortisol is know as the “fight or flight” hormone. Cortisol is meant to
rise when in times of stress, such as running from a potential threat, and then
the hormone drops when the threat is removed. This hormone is created by the
adrenal glands and produces the burst of energy needed for that response. The
problem with our current lifestyle is a chronic state of stress. This chronic
stress requires the adrenal glands to work overtime and becomes the priority of
the endocrine system, putting other functions on the back…

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